CCJ Reports

All Bibb County students eat for free. That could be in jeopardy

All Bibb County students eat for free. That could be in jeopardy

Samantha Max, Report for America corps member

September 3, 2018


Filed under Engagement Projects, Macon Food Story

Dozens of kindergarteners lined up in the cafeteria at Alexander II Magnet School, eyeing their lunch options. On the menu that Tuesday, the students could choose between chicken patty sandwiches, spaghetti with meat sauce and an array of fruits and vegetables. A stack of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches...

Hundreds wait to receive a hot meal, but it’s uncertain when it might arrive

Hundreds wait to receive a hot meal, but it’s uncertain when it might arrive

Samantha Max, Report for America corps member

August 13, 2018


Filed under Engagement Projects, Macon Food Story

Every weekday around noon, Sherry Hatcher answers a knock on her door. The 70-year-old lives alone in a highrise apartment building on Gray Highway, and her daily visitor is a welcome break from the quiet of her otherwise lonely home. Hatcher is one of the 1,200 home-bound residents of Middle Georgia...

Hundreds wait to receive a hot meal, but it’s uncertain when it might arrive

Hundreds wait to receive a hot meal, but it’s uncertain when it might arrive

Samantha Max, Report for America corps member

August 13, 2018


Filed under Engagement Projects, Macon Food Story

Every weekday around noon, Sherry Hatcher answers a knock on her door. The 70-year-old lives alone in a highrise apartment building on Gray Highway, and her daily visitor is a welcome break from the quiet of her otherwise lonely home. Hatcher is one of the 1,200 home-bound residents of Middle Georgia...

What does the food you eat say about the life you live?

What does the food you eat say about the life you live?

Sonya Green

July 3, 2018


Filed under Macon Food Story, Showcase

Food is more than sustenance. Food is life. It’s history and culture that’s ever-evolving in the changing world. What the food you eat says about the life you live. Join the Center for Collaborative Journalism and our partners at The Telegraph, Georgia Public Broadcasting Macon and 13WMAZ for our project, Macon Food Story...

Your Food Story: Hummingbird Cake

Your Food Story: Hummingbird Cake

Gillian Brown, Erica Degue and Cassidy Herin, CCJ Digital Campers

July 3, 2018


Filed under Macon Food Story, Showcase

Do you have a great story about an old family recipe? Or maybe a favorite dish you like to make that represents you and your family? The Center for Collaborative Journalism is looking for volunteers to share their stories this year as part of a video series on "Your Food Story." If you are interested ...

Your Food Story: Chili Pack

Your Food Story: Chili Pack

By Gabrielle Jones, Colette Kania and Kalijah Rahming, CCJ Digital Campers

June 22, 2018


Filed under Macon Food Story

Every few months, William Ayears begins to crave a favorite childhood dish. While he was in elementary school in Sherman, Texas, his mother introduced him to a Frito-Lay Corn Chip Chili Pack, which he shared with his brother, Rodney, on many an afternoon. The tasty and convenient treat “was one...

Have real estate agents contributed to Bibb school segregation?

Have real estate agents contributed to Bibb school segregation?

Jenna Eason, Center for Collaborative Journalism

December 30, 2017


Filed under (Dis)Integration, Engagement Projects

When Lisa Mayfield was moving to Macon 20 years ago, she told her real estate agent she was going to send her children to public school, but her agent advised against it. “We were strong supporters of the public school system, and she said, ‘Well if that's the case, then you want to be in this...

Class of 1977 recalls the early years of segregation

December 26, 2017


Filed under (Dis)Integration, (Dis)Integration Videos, Engagement Projects

Members of Central’s class of 1977 were among the first Macon children to spend all or most of their school years in racially integrated schools. At the 40-year reunion, several Central High alums recalled those days of integration. .mcclatchy-embed{position:relative;padding:40px 0 56.25%;height:0;overflow:hidden;max-width:100%}.mcclatchy-embed iframe...

They were among the first to integrate. Here’s what Central High’s class of ’77 learned

They were among the first to integrate. Here’s what Central High’s class of ’77 learned

Adam Ragusea, Center for Collaborative Journalism

December 26, 2017


Filed under (Dis)Integration, (Dis)Integration Videos, Engagement Projects

Avis Felts and Fred Frost hadn’t seen each other since they graduated Central High School in Macon in 1977. But when they reunited at Healy Point Country Club at their recent 40-year class reunion, they picked up where they had started in the fourth grade at Alexander IV Elementary: as fast friends. Frost...

What would Bibb schools’ racial makeup be if everyone went to their zoned school?

Maggie Lee

December 20, 2017


Filed under (Dis)Integration, Engagement Projects, Uncategorized

These maps show roughly where Bibb children live and which schools serve them. Each dot stands for three children who lived within a small area called a “Census Block Group” in 2010. Elementary School zones black white other race or multiracial NOTES While it’s not a dot on ea...

How do parents choose the right school for their children?

How do parents choose the right school for their children?

Center for Collaborative Journalism

December 18, 2017


Filed under (Dis)Integration, (Dis)Integration Videos, Uncategorized

The Center For Collaborative Journalism (CCJ) faculty, staff and students joined The Telegraph and GPB in a community engagement project that began in 2016 to examine our community’s experience with the nationwide trend of racial resegregation in schools. We held public forums to explore the history...

Kelly Neal

Mitch Jaugstetter and Paige Hill, Center for Collaborative Journalism

December 16, 2017


Filed under (Dis)Integration, (Dis)Integration Videos

Kelly Neal works in Macon but lives in Jones County so her two children with intellectual disabilities can attend a public school that can accommodate them.

Macon Food Story